CLINICAL STUDIES FOR VACUUM THERAPY

CLINICAL STUDIES FOR VACUUM THERAPY

CLINICAL STUDIES ON ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION PUMP (Vacuum Erection Device VED or Penis Pump for ED)

Studies suggest that more than half of the men with ED have experienced satisfactory results from using penile pumps.

Vacuum Erection Device (VED) is one of the most effective and common choices of noninvasive therapy for ED. It consists of a cylindrical component and a suction device that the patient places around the penis to create negative pressure and achieve an erection.

Maintenance of erection is then accomplished with an elastic constriction ring placed at the base of the penis. Patients with significant peripheral vascular disease, those receiving anticoagulants, and diabetics are generally not good candidates for the VED.

Patient acceptance and satisfaction with VED in all types of ED (including diabetic ED), have been reported to be 68% to 83%, while the most frequent complications remain difficulty with ejaculation, penile pain, ecchymoses, hematomas, and petechiae (patients taking aspirin or warfarin are more likely to develop complications related to vascular fragility).

Vacuum erection devices (VED), because of their ability to draw blood into the penis regardless of nerve disturbance, have become the centerpiece of penile rehabilitation protocols.

Even nerve–sparing radical prostatectomy damages the cavernous nerves and leads to temporary erectile dysfunction (ED) in men recovering from prostate cancer surgery. Historically, patients recovering from prostate cancer surgery have been advised that the return of erectile function (EF) can take from 6 to 18 months, or even longer.

Recently, there has been a growing movement to proactively treat patients postoperatively for presumed nerve damage to stimulate nerve recovery and possibly reduce the degree of irreversible damage.

External vacuum therapy for erectile dysfunction: use and results

This review assesses the continuing role of noninvasive vacuum therapy as treatment for erectile dysfunction and discusses the action of negative pressure in producing assisted erection. Though recent research in this area has centered on the development of pharmaceutical therapies, vacuum-therapy programs appear to be a consistent long-term option for patients experiencing either chronic or occasional impotence of any etiology. Very little testing is required before the initiation of vacuum treatment, and the overall clinical success rate is approximately 90%. Significant success has been reported in more difficult patient populations, including those with veno-occlusive disorders and explanted penile prostheses.

The use of vacuum erection devices in erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy

he VED is an ideal therapy given that it increases blood flow and oxygenation to the corpora to reverse the changes that result in ED after RP.

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